Sun still unsettled for another few days

Sep 13, 2005

Geomagnetic storms are expected to continue for the next few days, raising the chances of disruptions to radio transmissions and other communications.

Flares and other solar activity spiked last week and continued through Monday night with four big M-class eruptions reported in one region of the Sun's surface.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted Tuesday that solar activity would continue until around Sept. 15 with geomagnetic storms reaching G2 level, solar radiation storms at S1, and radio blackouts reaching R2 over the next 24 hours.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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