Study reveals new alcoholic genes

Apr 18, 2006

U.S. government researchers say they have identified new genes that may contribute to excessive alcohol consumption.

Researchers supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism say their study -- conducted with strains of animals that have either a high or low innate preference for alcohol -- provides clues about the molecular mechanisms that underlie the tendency to drink heavily.

"These findings provide a wealth of new insights into the molecular determinants of excessive drinking, which could lead to a better understanding of alcoholism," notes NIAAA Director Dr. Ting-Kai Li.

A full report of the findings appears in the April 18 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: What happened to savings for the future?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

What makes Champagne bubbly?

Dec 09, 2014

(Phys.org)—Just in time for the holidays, scientists have unraveled some of the chemistry behind the diffusion of CO2 molecules in a glass of Champagne. Among their findings, they discovered that ethan ...

Thanks, fruit flies, for that pleasing beer scent

Oct 09, 2014

The familiar smell of beer is due in part to aroma compounds produced by common brewer's yeast. Now, researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports on October 9th have discovered why the ye ...

Recommended for you

All together now – three evolutionary perks of singing

Dec 24, 2014

We're enjoying the one time of year when protests of "I can't sing!" are laid aside and we sing carols with others. For some this is a once-a-year special event; the rest of the year is left to the professionals ...

Fish eye sheds light on color vision

Dec 23, 2014

A fish eye from a primitive time when Earth was but one single continent, has yielded evidence of color vision dating back at least 300 million years, researchers said Tuesday.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.