In Brief: BellSouth launches secure e-mail service

Apr 17, 2006

BellSouth has launched a secure e-mail system to cater to the needs of small businesses.

Secure Mail can be used with Microsoft Outlook or Outlook Express to enclose, encrypt, and deliver confidential information over the Internet.

The company pointed out that regular e-mails can be intercepted and even changed by hackers, so its latest system will have a "secure" icon that users can click on to encrypt the message.

The system is on offer for $7.95 per month per e-mail address.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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