Science experiments teach kids to think

Apr 14, 2006

A three-year program in Wisconsin's schools is developing new ways to teach science and critical thinking in kindergarten through 12th grade.

The Science Education Partnership Award, funded by a $250,000 grant from the National Center for Research Resources, developed experiments using organisms such as earthworms, fish and frogs, to teach children about environmental health problems like lead poisoning.

Eighth-graders at Bell Middle School, for example, are learning how minnows poisoned by lead respond more slowly to food. Students like Dale Saari, 13, have gained an understanding as to how lead-poisoned children, growing up in old, poorly maintained houses, might have learning problems in school.

Much like the fish, they are trapped in an environment that is hazardous to their health.

The science program is aimed at minority and underserved populations like the students at Bell Middle School where roughly 70 percent of the children are minority and roughly 80 percent are eligible for subsidized lunch.

There are plans to expand the number of teachers from the current two dozen to 30 this summer and 30 in the summer of 2007.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Paleolithic diet may have included snails 10,000 years earlier than previously thought

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New technologies are improving the lives of seniors

2 hours ago

If Betty Lewis falls at the Edgemere senior living community, a pendant she wears around her neck will alert the staff. The device picks up the motion of the fall and notifies staff members at the North Dallas facility so ...

Texas company helps energy giants keep track of equipment

5 hours ago

Keeping track of billions of dollars of equipment that's constantly on the move is one of the oil and gas industry's toughest challenges. Time is always money. But it's a fortune when it's downtime in the oilfield or offshore.

Recommended for you

Jurassic Welsh mammals were picky eaters, study finds

1 hour ago

For most people, mere mention of the word Jurassic conjures up images of huge dinosaurs chomping their way through lush vegetation – and each other. However, mammals and their immediate ancestors were also ...

The changing landscape of religion

4 hours ago

Religion is a key factor in demography, important for projections of future population growth as well as for other social indicators. A new journal, Yearbook of International Religious Demography, is the first to bring a quan ...

Abusive leadership infects entire team

4 hours ago

Supervisors who are abusive to individual employees can actually throw the entire work team into conflict, hurting productivity, finds new research led by a Michigan State University business scholar.

User comments : 0