Girl with two hearts healthy with just one

Apr 13, 2006

British surgeons are amazed how quickly a 12-year-old Welsh girl, who had her transplanted heart removed after 10 years, has recovered with her original heart.

Ten years ago in London, 2-year-old Hannah Clark had a new heart implanted because her own heart was swollen and unable to function on its own. Technology in mechanical devices then was not reliable enough to suit her doctors, and they left her own heart in place.

Last November, her body began rejecting the second heart. Dr. Magdi Yacoub, who performed Hannah's original heart transplant, advised surgeons to remove it and see if her own heart had strengthened.

It had, and the girl is recovering well and looking forward to returning to school, the BBC reported.

Professor Peter Weissberg, medical director of the British Heart Foundation, described the operation as an important event.

"Surgeons have thought for some time that if a heart is failing because of acute inflammation it might be able to recover if rested," he said. "This seems to be exactly what has happened in this case."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Traditional forms of media coverage valued over advertising, study finds

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Protons hog the momentum in neutron-rich nuclei

Oct 16, 2014

Like dancers swirling on the dance floor with bystanders looking on, protons and neutrons that have briefly paired up in the nucleus have higher-average momentum, leaving less for non-paired nucleons. Using ...

Scientist takes first step to measure chromium contamination

Apr 29, 2013

Judy Zelikoff is filling an unwanted role. Three decades after hexavalent chromium spread under a Garfield, N.J., neighborhood, this accomplished scientist and her team of researchers at New York University may finally be ...

Recommended for you

Ancient wheat points to Stone Age trading links

12 hours ago

(AP)—Britons may have discovered a taste for bread thousands of years earlier than previously thought, thanks to trade with more advanced neighbors on the European continent.

Humour in the 13th century characterized by ridicule

15 hours ago

We tend to think of the Middle Ages as grotesque and dreary. However, 13th century elites made use of laughter quite deliberately – and it resounded most loudly when it was at someone else's expense.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.