Volcanic overflow ruins Alaska salmon run

Sep 12, 2005

Salmon fishing along the King Salmon River on the Alaska Peninsula has been canceled -- primarily because no salmon showed up this year.

Fly-fishing guide Jon Kent told the Anchorage Daily News wild salmon sometimes are late, so he wasn't concerned in June. But then no salmon returned in July either along the river's upper section, which drains the flank of the Mount Chiginagak volcano about 350 miles southwest of Anchorage.

The river then started to turn orange, with "weird reddish foam and scum starting to come down the river."

When he boated upstream he found dead plants, gulls missing from an island and fish gone from the lake. Even brown bears were gone. Kent told the newspaper, "It's like someone dropped a bomb on the place."

State scientists subsequently found a new 1,300-foot-wide crater lake near the 7,005-foot volcano's summit had spilled, producing a foul slurry leaving part of the with an acidic pH level of 3.

Chiginagak has no recent history of eruption. However, scientists left a seismic recorder in the area to determine whether the volcano is becoming active. They won't have data for several weeks.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Greenland darkening to continue, predicts CCNY expert Marco Tedesco

Related Stories

Quantum Criticality in life's proteins

28 minutes ago

(Phys.org)—Stuart Kauffman, from the University of Calgary, and several of his colleagues have recently published a paper on the Arxiv server titled 'Quantum Criticality at the Origins of Life'. The id ...

Hackers attack Belgian press group, second in days

11 hours ago

Hackers attacked one of Belgium's top newspaper publishers on Sunday just days after Tunisian Islamist militants took control of a regional government portal to denounce US counter-terror operations.

An exoplanet with an infernal atmosphere

11 hours ago

As part of the PlanetS National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR), astronomers from the Universities of Geneva (UNIGE) and Bern, Switzerland, have come to measure the temperature of the atmosphere of ...

Recommended for you

Devices or divisive: Mobile technology in the classroom

13 hours ago

Little is known about how new mobile technologies affect students' development of non-cognitive skills such as empathy, self-control, problem solving, and teamwork. Two Boston College researchers say it's ...

Forming school networks to educate 'the new mainstream'

19 hours ago

As immigration increases the number of non-English speaking "culturally and linguistically diverse" students, schools will need to band together in networks focused on the challenges of educating what has been called "the ...

Rare tidal movements expose Kimberley dinosaur tracks

19 hours ago

While audiences in Perth attend Walking with Dinosaurs this weekend palaeontologists working near Broome will be documenting the extinct vertebrates' extensive fossilised footsteps using laser scanning technology.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.