Fermilab Offers Tours of Antimatter Production Site, April 23 and May 21

Apr 12, 2006

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are offering special "Antimatter Tours" on Sunday, April 23 and May 21, starting at 12:45 p.m. The two-hour program includes a 45-minute presentation by Fermilab scientists followed by a tour, led by Antiproton Source head Keith Gollwitzer, through a section of the accelerator tunnel that is used to produce antiprotons.

Since its start-up in 1985, Fermilab's Antiproton Source has produced just over 3.91 nanograms (billionth of a gram) of antiprotons, the largest amount ever produced by any accelerator. Visitors will learn about the nature of antimatter and how scientists produce tiny amounts of antiprotons at Fermilab. Throughout the program scientists will be on hand to answer questions.

Often referred to as the "mirror world," antimatter has the opposite electrical charge of matter. Upon contact, matter and antimatter particles annihilate and release energy as tiny flashes of light. This effect is used in a medical application called Positron Emission Tomography. Known as a PET scan, the technique relies on the detection of light rays produced by the annihilation of positrons, the antimatter-partners of the well-known electrons.

Participation in the program is limited. Visitors need to register online at http://eddata.fnal.gov/lasso/program_search/show_eventID.lasso?name=Ask (preferred method), or they can send an email to edreg@fnal.gov or call 630-840-5588. The minimum age for participation is 10 years. The tour requires walking and involves stairs. Visitors should wear comfortable shoes. Advance registration for the program, which is free of charge, is required.

Explore further: New portable vacuum standard

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Satellite witnesses developing US nor'easter

18 minutes ago

National Weather Service forecasters have been tracking a low pressure area that moved from the Midwest into the Atlantic Ocean today, and is expected to become a strong nor'easter that will bring blizzard ...

Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers

39 minutes ago

Nature has many examples of self-assembly, and bioengineers are interested in copying or manipulating these systems to create useful new materials or devices. Amyloid proteins, for example, can self-assemble ...

Recommended for you

New portable vacuum standard

6 hours ago

A novel Portable Vacuum Standard (PVS) has been added to the roster of NIST's Standard Reference Instruments (SRI). It is now available for purchase as part of NIST's ongoing commitment to disseminate measurement ...

Hybrid memory device for superconducting computing

6 hours ago

A team of NIST scientists has devised and demonstrated a novel nanoscale memory technology for superconducting computing that could hasten the advent of an urgently awaited, low-energy alternative to power-hungry conventional ...

Prototype for first traceable PET-MR phantom

6 hours ago

As cancer diagnostic tools, a new class of imagers – which combines positron-emission tomography (PET) with magnetic resonance imaging (MR or MRI) – has shown promise in the few years since these hybrid ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.