Briefs: Telenor, Addvalue sign satellite agreement

Apr 05, 2006

Telenor Satellite Services signed an agreement with Addvalue Technologies Wednesday on satellite air time used by BGAN terminals.

BGAN (Broadband Global Area Network) terminals are designed to deliver satellite broadband data and voice service in remote areas where normal telecom service is spotty or entirely unavailable.

Specifically, the deal allows the bundling of Addvalue's SABRE 1 BGAN terminals with Telenor airtime.

Addvalue CEO Colin Chan said in a news release said the bundling would help build Addvalue's position as a one-stop resource for BGAN satellite services.

Telenor Satellite Services, a division of Telenor of Norway, entered into a strategic alliance with Singapore-based Addvalue earlier this year to build up market share for Addvalue BGAN equipment on the ground and Telenor's satellites in space.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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