Imaging may help with depression

Apr 03, 2006

Whether or not cognitive behavior therapy will help a person recover from depression can be predicted through brain imaging, a U.S. study found.

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers say more than 17 million U.S. adults will experience at least one episode of major depression this year, but only 40 percent to 60 percent will respond to any given first-line treatment, such as therapy or medication.

Being able to predict who will respond to cognitive behavior therapy, and who will not, may prove to be a valuable tool for treating depression, said study leader Greg J. Siegle, assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

"We found that people with depression who have increased activity in one area of the brain and decreased activity in another in response to emotional stimuli, are more likely to respond to a specific treatment -- cognitive therapy," said Siegle. "If this finding holds true, we may be able to predict what therapies will be most effective."

The American Journal of Psychiatry published the findings.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: New search planned for grave of Spanish poet Lorca

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cognitive therapy key to tackling depression

Dec 14, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- New research from The University of Western Ontario shows why people suffering from depression may have a far greater hope of finding lasting relief by receiving cognitive therapy, rather than simply taking ...

The playground of neural engineering

May 08, 2014

A game player uses Thalia, a wearable interactive system, and then smiles in order to keep a unicorn in flight as it jumps through rainbows.

Recommended for you

New search planned for grave of Spanish poet Lorca

4 hours ago

Archeologists will start inspecting land in southern Spain near where the acclaimed poet Federico Garcia Lorca is believed to have been executed and buried at the start of the Spanish Civil War in 1936, officials said Friday.

Family financing is anything but foolish

7 hours ago

Borrowing money from a family member or friend to start a business is often considered dangerous, both financially and emotionally, however new research conducted by an entrepreneurial expert at the University of Adelaide ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.