Value of insects in U.S. is $57 billion

Apr 03, 2006
Insects

The services that insects provide the United States are worth $57 billion, Cornell University entomologists calculated.

"Most insects tirelessly perform functions that improve our environment and lives in ways that scientists are only beginning to understand," said study co-author John Losey. "Don't let the insects' small stature fool you -- these minute marvels provide valuable services."

The study, published in the journal BioScience, found that native insects are food for wildlife -- supporting a $50 billion recreation industry. Insects also generate more than $4.5 billion in pest control, pollinate $3 billion in crops and clean up grazing lands -- saving ranchers some $380 million a year.

These are "very conservative" estimates that probably represent only a fraction of the true value of inspects, said Losey, an associate professor of entomology at Cornell.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Shrinking dinosaurs evolved into flying birds (w/ Video)

15 hours ago

A new study involving scientists from the University of Southampton has revealed how massive, meat-eating, ground-dwelling dinosaurs evolved into agile flying birds: they just kept shrinking and shrinking, ...

Congressional rift over environment influences public

19 hours ago

American citizens are increasingly divided over the issue of environmental protection and seem to be taking their cue primarily from Congress, finds new research led by a Michigan State University scholar.

Rural loss and ruin can be avoided

22 hours ago

An Australian Reconstruction Development Board needs to be established to help avoid more needless forcing of Australian farmers from their land, a QUT economist has said.

User comments : 0