Briefs: Comptel challenges FCC ruling on Verizon

Mar 30, 2006

The telecom industry group Comptel is challenging a recent FCC ruling that stripped a wide range of regulations from Verizon's high-capacity data services.

Comptel filed a petition for review Wednesday with the federal appeals court in Washington on the grounds the Federal Communications Commission failed to protect the public interest in its ruling.

"When the chairman of a federal agency is able to abdicate his responsibility to protect the public interest, and instead chooses to advance the private financial interests of a single giant corporation, it is time for the courts to step in and protect the public," Comptel President Earl Comstock said in a statement. "The FCC's default grant of forbearance makes Verizon the only telecommunications company in the entire country that is not subject to regulatory oversight."

FCC Chairman Kevin Martin ruled March 9 in favor of Verizon's request for relief from common carrier obligations despite critics who said the move would allow Verizon to raise its prices and block competitors' access to its network.

Comptel represents competitor companies that could be affected by the ruling.

Comstock said Martin's decision was based on "an unconstitutional delegation by Congress to an unelected federal official."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Greenland darkening to continue, predicts CCNY expert Marco Tedesco

Related Stories

Recommended for you

'Map spam' puts Google in awkward place

1 hour ago

Google was re-evaluating its user-edited online map system Friday after the latest embarrassing incident—an image of an Android mascot urinating on an Apple logo.

Team develops faster, higher quality 3-D camera

1 hour ago

When Microsoft released the Kinect for Xbox in November 2010, it transformed the video game industry. The most inexpensive 3-D camera to date, the Kinect bypassed the need for joysticks and controllers by ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.