Feds: Help fish spawn or remove dams

Mar 30, 2006

U.S. wildlife officials say they will not renew licenses for four hydroelectric dams in California unless steps are taken to help imperiled wild salmon.

Federal wildlife agencies say the owner of the dams along the Klamath River must provide a way in which the salmon can reach their upriver spawning grounds. The salmon's passage has been blocked for nearly a century by the four hydroelectric facilities, The Los Angeles Times reported Thursday.

The owner of the dams, PacifiCorp of Portland, Ore., must now decide whether to spend as much as $175 million to build large fish ladders or abandon the dams.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service and other federal agencies issued the demand after PacifiCorp filed an application to renew its operating licenses.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: How were fossil tracks made by Early Triassic swimming reptiles so well preserved?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tiny Oregon minnow is first fish taken off endangered list

Feb 17, 2015

A tiny minnow that lives only in backwaters in Oregon's Willamette Valley is the first fish to be formally removed from Endangered Species Act protection because it is no longer in danger of extinction, officials ...

Advocates: Dams put dinosaur-like river fish at risk

Feb 02, 2015

Wildlife advocates claimed in a federal lawsuit filed Monday that the dinosaur-like pallid sturgeon could be wiped out in stretches of rivers in Montana and North Dakota if the federal government doesn't deal with dams that ...

Recommended for you

Predicting human crowds with statistical physics

Feb 27, 2015

For the first time researchers have directly measured a general law of how pedestrians interact in a crowd. This law can be used to create realistic crowds in virtual reality games and to make public spaces safer.

Bribery 'hits 1.6 billion people a year'

Feb 27, 2015

A total of 1.6 billion people worldwide – nearly a quarter of the global population – are forced to pay bribes to gain access to everyday public services, according to a new book by academics at the Universities of Birmingham ...

Broken windows thesis springs a leak

Feb 27, 2015

The broken windows theory posits that minor misdemeanors, like littering or graffiti spraying, stimulate more serious anti-social behavior. LMU sociologists now argue that the idea is flawed and does not ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.