Nanonutrients' Promise: Vast Gains In Human Health

Mar 28, 2006
Nanonutrients' Promise: Vast Gains In Human Health
Cover of the March issue of Food Technology magazine, published for 60 years by the non-profit Institute of Food Technologists.

The emerging discipline of nanotechnology holds the promise of improving functional foods and the capability of delivering healthful food compounds to the body where it can utilize them best. This is according to the latest issue of Food Technology magazine.

Remarkable achievements in nanotechnology—the science, engineering and technology of controlling matter one-billionth a meter in size—show great potential for positively influencing human health, the article states. By enhancing solubility, improving bioavailability, and facilitating the controlled release and protecting the stability of micronutrients in food products, nanotechnology could be a successful method to design smart food systems able to target specific systems within the body and their functions.

The report cites current applications that allow nanoscale food components to be encapsulated and mixed with other foods in novel combinations. In some instances it means now being able to dissolve in water compounds like vitamins, antioxidants and healthy oils that usually are not water-soluble. In some instances, nanoscale particles are so small that they’re clear, expanding their potential for use in a wide variety of products.

The article notes that nanoparticles are excellent for rapidly delivering high concentrations of healthy, active ingredients directly to cell membranes. On the other hand, the article highlights that nanoscale adhesive properties may be used to bind to harmful matter and remove potentially harmful compounds from the digestive tract.

Published by the international not-for-profit Institute of Food Technologists and advancing food and health through sound science, Food Technology provides news and analysis of the development, use, quality, safety, and regulation of food sources, products, and processes.

Food Technology is accessible online at www.ift.org/foodtechnology.

Source: Institute of Food Technologists

Explore further: Wiring up carbon-based electronics

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Making dams safer for fish around the world

Apr 14, 2014

Think of the pressure change you feel when an elevator zips you up multiple floors in a tall building. Imagine how you'd feel if that elevator carried you all the way up to the top of Mt. Everest – in the ...

Decline of natural history troubling for science, society

Mar 27, 2014

the study of organisms, how and where they live and how they interact with their environment – appears to be in steep decline in developed countries, according to Joshua Tewksbury, a University of Washington ...

Recommended for you

Wiring up carbon-based electronics

2 hours ago

Carbon-based nanostructures such as nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanoribbons are unique building blocks showing versatile nanomechanical and nanoelectronic properties. These materials which are ordered ...

Physicists create new nanoparticle for cancer therapy

Apr 16, 2014

A University of Texas at Arlington physicist working to create a luminescent nanoparticle to use in security-related radiation detection may have instead happened upon an advance in photodynamic cancer therapy.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Wiring up carbon-based electronics

Carbon-based nanostructures such as nanotubes, graphene sheets, and nanoribbons are unique building blocks showing versatile nanomechanical and nanoelectronic properties. These materials which are ordered ...

Tiny power plants hold promise for nuclear energy

Small underground nuclear power plants that could be cheaper to build than their behemoth counterparts may herald the future for an energy industry under intense scrutiny since the Fukushima disaster, the ...

Hand out money with my mobile? I think I'm ready

A service is soon to launch in the UK that will enable us to transfer money to other people using just their name and mobile number. Paym is being hailed as a revolution in banking because you can pay peopl ...