Tech sector donating to Katrina relief

Sep 01, 2005

The U.S. technology community is lending its support to efforts to cleanup damage from Hurricane Katrina.

Thousands are thought to be dead and hundreds of thousands may become refugees from devastated areas of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama left without communications, electricity and clean water.

CNet reports Sprint Nextel will send dozens of dispatch and repair vehicles and thousands of two-way radiophones to utilities in the Gulf Coast.

Qwest Communications donated $230,000 to the American Red Cross to train rescue volunteers and is sending 2,000 calling cards so those affected can contact friends and family.

Comcast will donate $10 million dollars in advertising time for public service announcements.

Intel Foundation is donating $1 million to the Red Cross and will match employee donations.

Amazon.com is allowing donations to be made via its Web site and the nationwide community Web site Craigslist.com is listing volunteer openings, messages from loved ones and free refugee housing.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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