Texas Memory Systems and StarGen to Increase Efficiency, Performance of Military Grade Embedded Applications

Aug 02, 2004

SAM-650 DSP Supercomputer Delivers 192 GFLOPS over Low Latency StarFabric

Texas Memory Systems (TMS), manufacturer of the World's Fastest Storage(R), today announced that it has teamed with semiconductor company StarGen to integrate the TMS SAM-650 DSP supercomputer with a StarFabric switched interconnect. The integration, requested by a mutual government agency customer, is expected to benefit multiple, military-grade embedded applications requiring extremely high performance and reliability.

"StarFabric is a well established, proven interconnect technology," said Holly Frost, CEO of Texas Memory Systems. "TMS DSP systems have historically sought out a wide variety of high-performance interconnects, and we anticipate that the new StarFabric interface for the SAM-650 will be a welcome option for many of our customers."

By providing 192 GFLOPS of processing power and 16 GB/second of shared storage bandwidth, the SAM-650 DSP Supercomputer eliminates most DSP performance bottlenecks associated with processing high bandwidth signals. It is designed to deliver extreme performance in a unit that is physically small, power efficient, and cost-effective.

The StarFabric switched interconnect fabric is widely used in medical imaging, video serving, semiconductor test equipment, communication routers and switches, military command and control, and storage equipment. It is ideally suited for embedded systems needing enhanced switched PCI capability, as well as communication access platforms for voice, data and video networks.

"We expect both government and commercial applications to benefit from the high performance capabilities of the combined solution," said Tim Miller, StarGen CEO. "The high performance of the SAM-650 and the low latency and high throughput of StarFabric can boost the performance of these types of/any embedded application(s)."

The original press release can be found here.

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