Men's IQs higher, but used differently

Aug 25, 2005

Controversial British psychologist Richard Lynn has determined men have bigger brains and higher IQs than women, the Daily Mail reported Thursday.

Lynn, of the University of Ulster, and Dr. Paul Irwing, a senior lecturer in organizational psychology at the University of Manchester, analyzed the results of more than 20,000 reasoning tests taken by university students around the world.

"These different proportions of men and women with high IQs may go some way to explaining the greater numbers of men achieving distinctions of various kinds of which a high IQ is required, such as chess grandmasters, Nobel prizewinners and the like," Lynn said.

However, he notes the brainpower is used differently among the genders.

"There is some evidence to suggest that, for any given level of IQ, women are able to achieve more than men, possibly because they are more conscientious and better adapted to sustained periods of hard work," he said.

Lynn previously stirred controversy when he claimed intelligence varies with race.

The report will be published by the British Journal of Psychology.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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