Frank Lloyd Wright church to be geothermal

Aug 16, 2005

A nearly 100-year-old Frank Lloyd Wright-designed church near Chicago will reportedly become the first Wright landmark to utilize geothermal energy.

The Unity Temple Restoration Foundation said Tuesday the project will not help preserve the building and will bring additional international attention to the church.

Designed in 1905, the Oak Park, Ill, Unitarian Universalist church was built for approximately $60,000. Wright used cast-in-place reinforced concrete as structural and decorative material in order to reduce costs.

The foundation said Wright's cubic design broke barriers for both religious and secular architecture and provided Unity Temple with a singular distinction in the history of architecture.

The multi-million-dollar project to replace the building's antiquated heating and nearly non-existent cooling systems with the more environmentally friendly geothermal technology is compatible with the highest standards in historic preservation, said UTRF Executive Director Keith Bringe. "I believe Mr. Wright would approve of this plan," he added.

The geothermal system will reduce reliance on fossil fuels by up to 80 percent. The temple's ground source system will be supported by about 26 wells, each with a depth of 300 to 400 feet.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean

6 hours ago

As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle ...

Underwater elephants

6 hours ago

In the high-tech world of science, researchers sometimes need to get back to basics. UC Santa Barbara's Douglas McCauley did just that to study the impacts of the bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) on cor ...

Recommended for you

Children's book explores Really Big Numbers

2 hours ago

A new children's book written and illustrated by a Brown mathematics professor Richard Schwartz takes readers on a visual journal through the infinite number system. Schwartz hopes Really Big Numbers will ...

Shrinking dinosaurs evolved into flying birds (w/ Video)

20 hours ago

A new study involving scientists from the University of Southampton has revealed how massive, meat-eating, ground-dwelling dinosaurs evolved into agile flying birds: they just kept shrinking and shrinking, ...

User comments : 0