Power lines may offer Internet connections

Aug 15, 2005

There are three basic on-ramps to the broadband highway: cable telephone line or satellite -- but electric companies may soon join the fray.

The idea, itself, is simple: use the power lines that go into nearly every home in the United States to enable Internet connections.

But the Christian Science Monitor reports it's not quite that easy in practice, since utility companies face some technological hurdles and they've had to be persuaded it's a profitable venture.

But a technology called Broadband over Power Lines has gained investments from major companies, including Google and IBM, and will soon be entering major markets.

"Our hope is that in the next two years you'll see millions of homes" using BPL, Kevin Kushman, vice president of corporate development at CURRENT Communications Group in Germantown, Md., told the newspaper.

A market research company, Telecom Trends International, is forecasting BPL revenue will rise from $57.1 million last year to $4.4 billion by 2011.

Electric utilities find the idea doubly attractive, since BPL can also be used for several tasks, such as outage identification, meter reading and monitoring lines for electric "noise" or other interference.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: IOC defends Rio legacy amid green protests

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Vandalism in Arizona shows the Internet's vulnerability

Feb 26, 2015

(AP)—Computers, cellphones and landlines in Arizona were knocked out of service for hours, ATMs stopped working, 911 systems were disrupted and businesses were unable to process credit card transactions—all ...

Creating the energy Internet

19 hours ago

It only takes a power outage of a few minutes in the middle of a busy workday to drive home the hazards of relying on an energy infrastructure rooted in the Industrial Age. Without the electricity delivered ...

FCC allows city-owned Internet providers to expand

15 hours ago

(AP)—People in small communities may get better, cheaper access to the Internet after the Federal Communications Commission ruled Thursday that city-owned broadband services can expand into areas overlooked by commercial ...

The world's first printed jet engine

Feb 25, 2015

Monash University researchers along with collaborators from CSIRO and Deakin University have printed a jet engine. In fact Monash and their spin-out company Amaero, have printed two engines. One is on display ...

Recommended for you

IOC defends Rio legacy amid green protests

10 minutes ago

Ecological protests on Saturday dogged the final day of an International Olympic Committee executive board meeting in Rio as green campaigners slated the choice of a nature reserve to hold the golf event ...

Japan's NTT to buy German data centre operator

10 minutes ago

Japanese telecom giant NTT Communications is looking to acquire German data centre operator e-shelter, as it seeks to cash in on growing demand in Europe, a newspaper reported Saturday.

Fashionable or geeky—the modern watch dilemma

4 hours ago

It's Milan fashion week, you've got tickets to the catwalk shows and an outfit to die for, but which watch to wear? A chunky smartwatch or chic ticker that can't tell the time?

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.