Accessorizing cells phones a growing trend

Aug 09, 2005

No longer does accessorizing a cell phone mean leather cases or cartoon covers. Now, individual artists and companies alike are profiting from an environment in which individuals make personal statements by adding flashy wallpaper, animated screen savers, pop-song ring tones and even antenna charms to their handsets.

The charms represent the latest addition to personalized cell phones. Jeweled accessories made into hearts, bears and tiaras with a stretchable ring on the back have been a craze in Asia for the last two years and only now are hitting the U.S. market.

Tiffany Weidman, a resident of Forney, Texas, first ran across Trinkies on the Internet last April and began selling them on eBay. She said customers can slip on a "glam princess" look for today or choose a "hippie chick" ring for tomorrow.

"I'm not really a girly-girl, but as far as accessories go, I think they're cute," Weidman told United Press International. "That's why I started selling them."

Since then, Weidman began her own Web site, selling the charms for $5 each, and has been seeing sales double each month since April.

She said pink crowns are the most popular and she will soon begin designing her own charms, too. In September she will add slot machines, smiley faces, martini glasses and Eiffel Towers to her offerings.

Cell-phone accessories also are becoming more electronic, with the addition of cameras, ring tones and animated screen savers becoming more popular and cheaper.

Jamster!, a leading provider of mobile content, is capitalizing on this latest trend of making personal statements via cell phones. The company offers more than 1,000 options in popular music ring tones, wallpaper, graphics and games to customers who pay $5.99 for various downloading plans.

"These accessories are a new vehicle for attracting new customers," Brian O'Shaughnessy, a Jamster! spokesman, told UPI. "There are two functional aspects, one is that more Americans are becoming aware of personalization and second is the combination of mobility and entertainment."

Most consumers recognize Jamster! by the company's television commercials for ring tones, animated screensavers and wallpaper that feature pop artists and creations such as Crazy Frog -- the same ring tone used in "Crazy Frog Axel F" that took the No.1 spot on the British pop-music charts.

"Artists are also using this environment and their entertainment to attract new fans," O'Shaughnessy said. "A number of them understand the power of this medium."

One example is the hip-hop tour, "Scream Tour IV: The Heartthrobs," which Jamster! is co-sponsoring. The company provides its customers with unique mobile content, especially from artists from the tour, which includes Bow Wow, Omarion, Marques Houston and 3on3.

"We've only scratched the surface," O'Shaughnessy said. "People are going to buy and use more of these (accessories) once they become more available, but most of it is in Japan and the (United Kingdom). This is really going to explode."

As broadband becomes cheaper in the United States, accessorizing cell phones most likely will be taken to a new level, as enhanced cell-phone technologies continue to come out of Asia and the United Kingdom.

These include the ability to download more advanced games and cameras, .pdf files and MP3 quality music, as well as applications such as "Digital Stadium," by CratMax in Tokyo, on DoCoMo 3G cell phones that will display cartoon versions of select live professional baseball games.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: BofA to refund Apple Pay customers charged twice

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms

Oct 18, 2014

Throw a rock through a window made of silica glass, and the brittle, insulating oxide pane shatters. But whack a golf ball with a club made of metallic glass—a resilient conductor that looks like metal—and the glass not ...

Organic tin in polymers increases their light absorption

Sep 26, 2014

Researchers of the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel (CAU), Germany, successfully integrated organic tin into semiconducting polymers (plastics) for the first time. Semiconducting polymers can be used, ...

A dye with tunable optical characteristics

Sep 12, 2014

Researchers from RIKEN and the University of Tokyo have developed an organic dye molecule with tunable light-absorption and color characteristics. This development promises to open the door to the creation ...

Molecular gate that could keep cancer cells locked up

Jul 31, 2014

In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, ...

Recommended for you

A blue Christmas for Amazon?

1 minute ago

It might be a blue Christmas for Amazon. The world's largest retailer gave a disappointing forecast for the crucial holiday quarter. The company also reported a wider loss than analysts expected for the third ...

Tech firm fined for paying workers $1.21 per hour

1 hour ago

A Silicon Valley company is paying more than $43,000 in back wages and penalties after labor regulators found eight employees imported from India were being treated like they were in an overseas sweat shop while they were ...

User comments : 0