Verizon aims to curb cell 'sticker shock'

Aug 08, 2005

Verizon is seeking to eliminate unpleasant surprises on cell-phone bills that can cause parents to think twice before turning the devices over to their kids.

Since teenagers may not grasp the consequences of too much talking or messaging, Verizon is giving parents the ability to monitor their kids' cell-phone use and prevent them from going over their calling-plan limits.

"Knowing the size of their minute and TXT messaging packages, plus using Verizon Wireless' tools for tracking usage, parents can help teens take responsibility and practice managing real world costs," said Verizon's Marni Walden.

Parents can use their teen's cell phone to dial #DATA to hear details of the costs of text-message plans, or #BAL to monitor the number of minutes used and still available.

In addition, Verizon offers flat-rate calling plans that may be a better deal than pay-as-you-go fees for particularly loquacious teens.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

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