World First ~ The Walkman™ phones 100

Aug 01, 2005

Sony Ericsson announces first global search for the world’s favourite music
Do you love driving to the Rolling Stones or dancing to Madonna? Sony Ericsson is compiling ‘The Walkman phones 100’ - the first soundtrack of the world’s favourite songs of all time, to coincide with the launch of its new family of Walkman phones.

Whether it was the song playing at the time of your first kiss or the first song you ever bought, music lovers from across the globe will be invited to log onto www.walkmanphones100.com to register their top three tracks of all time and the reasons why these songs make up the soundtrack to their life. Immediately, fans will then see where their songs are placed in the overall poll, and whether or not their favourites have yet reached the top 100.

The site, powered by Lycos, goes live from 12th August for six weeks. Having registered their three songs, voters will also have the chance to win the ultimate collectable item for any serious music lover; one of the new Walkman phones complete with the world’s 100 favourite songs, as voted for by music fans worldwide on www.walkmanphones100.com . Furthermore, Sony Ericsson will be giving lucky runners-up a member of its new family of Walkman phones, which includes the hotly awaited debut Walkman phone, the W800. The results of ‘The Walkman phones 100’ global vote will be released worldwide on the 28th September 2005.

Miles Flint, President of Sony Ericsson, commented: “We are incredibly excited to be introducing the first Walkman mobile phone to the market. The Sony Ericsson W800 is the first of a family of Walkman phones which are designed to bring a complete music proposition to the consumer. To mark this occasion we are now launching The Walkman Phones 100. Now consumers worldwide can vote for their favourite music and help compile the first ever poll of the worlds top 100 songs.”

“The Walkman phone allows you to store around 125 tracks and so listen to your own soundtrack to your life, wherever you are, whenever you want while staying in touch with your world. We are confident that this search for the global soundtrack of 100 songs will produce a number of surprising entries; what may well be a popular choice for people in Latin America, will be completely different for people in Australia. The results should give a fascinating insight into the type of music people from all corners of the globe associate with their lives while at the same time reaffirming the universal enjoyment all the people of the world share when listening to their favourite tunes.”


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