NASA's Goes-N Satellite Ready for Launch

Jul 27, 2005

NASA announced the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-N (GOES-N) is ready to launch. The GOES-N launch window is from 6:23 to 7:01 p.m. EDT, Friday, July 29, 2005. Liftoff is from Space Launch Complex 37, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.

GOES-N joins a system of weather satellites that provide timely environmental information to meteorologists and the public. The GOES system graphically displays the intensity, path and size of storms. Early warning of impending severe weather enhances the public's ability to take shelter and protect property.

"NASA is proud to provide this tool for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) use in weather operations," said Martin Davis. He is the GOES program manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Md. The GOES system serves the central and eastern Pacific Ocean; North, Central, and South America; and the central and western Atlantic Ocean.

The system includes GOES-10, 11 and 12. GOES-11 is in an on-orbit storage mode. GOES-N becomes GOES-13 shortly after launch. It will be checked out, stored on-orbit and available for activation should either GOES-10 or 12 fails or exhausts its fuel. The satellite is the first in the GOES N-P series of spacecraft that will continuously observe and measure meteorological phenomena in real time. The series will provide the meteorological community and atmospheric scientists improved observational and measurement data.

GOES-N will be launched on a Boeing Delta IV (4, 2) vehicle under an FAA commercial license. The satellite will be turned over to NASA after a successful checkout is completed by Boeing Space and Intelligence Systems.

NOAA manages the GOES program, establishes requirements, provides all funding and distributes environmental satellite data for the United States.

GSFC procures and manages the development and launch of the satellites for NOAA on a cost reimbursable basis. GSFC also manages the design, development and launch of NOAA satellites. Boeing, acting as lead contractor, built GOES-N.

For more information about the GOES-N mission and program on the Web, visit:
www.nasa.gov/goes-n goespoes.gsfc.nasa.gov www.noaa.gov/


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