U.S. and Australia OK secret climate pact

Jul 26, 2005

Australia has reportedly joined the United States, China, India and South Korea in signing a secret agreement concerning greenhouse emissions.

The Australian said the pack would replace the controversial Kyoto climate protocol. The newspaper said the alliance, which is yet to be announced, will include nations that together account for more than 40 percent of the world's greenhouse gas emissions.

The secret agreement, to be known as the Asia-Pacific Partnership for Clean Development and Climate, would require signatories to use the latest technologies available to limit emissions and to make sure those technologies are available to industries that need them most.

The United States and Australia have refused to sign the Kyoto protocol -- an international agreement setting greenhouse gas emission targets for developed countries by 2012.

The secret pact was designed to reduce greenhouse emissions, but not harm development or economic growth.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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