Russia Taps Space Market With Decommissioned Missiles

Jul 22, 2005

Russia is hoping to increase sales in the international space market of the "Rokot", a lightweight, cost-efficient launcher based on the old Soviet intercontinental ballistic missile Stiletto (aka SS-19).

According to RIA Novista, Russia's Far East SpacePort at Plesetsk has seen five successful commercial launches, lofting thirteen satellites.

A single Rokot launch costs $12 million to $14 million, which is far less expensive than the launches of similar converted ICBMs.

While hundreds of Russian ballistic missiles will be cannibalized under international arms-reduction treaties, most of them are already nearing the scrap-only 15-20-year age.

The Rokot concept is marketed internationally by Eurorokot, a company partly owned by European aerospace firm EADS. Industry analysts say the Rokot has good prospects on the market until 2008, when Europe is expected to begin selling its new light rocket, the Vega.

Copyright 2005 by Space Daily, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Cassini spacecraft reveals 101 geysers and more on icy Saturn moon

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Russian Space Industry Still Optimistic And Creative

Mar 06, 2006

Russia's Federal Space Program for 2006-2015 includes government allocations for a series of light spacecraft, so technologically advanced that, at two- to three-digit weights in kilos, they successfully do what 20 years ...

Russia Hopes To Launch Reusable Spacecraft In 2012

Feb 08, 2006

It does not sound likely that Russia will employ a reusable spacecraft in 2012 - but it is. On Friday, February 3, the Russian Space Agency is due to announce the developer of a new Russian reusable spacecraft, reports RIA ...

Recommended for you

Mysterious molecules in space

9 hours ago

Over the vast, empty reaches of interstellar space, countless small molecules tumble quietly though the cold vacuum. Forged in the fusion furnaces of ancient stars and ejected into space when those stars ...

Image: NASA's SDO observes a lunar transit

17 hours ago

On July 26, 2014, from 10:57 a.m. to 11:42 a.m. EDT, the moon crossed between NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit.

Image: Tethys in sunlight

18 hours ago

Tethys, like many moons in the solar system, keeps one face pointed towards the planet around which it orbits. Tethys' anti-Saturn face is seen here, fully illuminated, basking in sunlight. On the right side ...

User comments : 0