System to detect objects in food products

Jul 22, 2005

Field tests are to begin this summer on a system designed to detect plastic and other foreign objects in food products.

Detectors now used by food processors can keep metal fragments out of finished products, but as plastic use becomes more widespread, plastic contamination is a growing concern.

For the past year, John Stewart, a research engineer at the Georgia Tech Research Institute, has been leading a team in building a computer-vision system to identify plastic and other unwanted elements in finished food products.

The system, now in final development stages, will undergo field-testing later this summer.

Use of humans to inspect products is not efficient. Although people are easily trained, they are also easily distracted, said GTRI Research Engineer Doug Britton.

"The product stream is moving very quickly -- about 12 feet per second, which is the equivalent of eight miles per hour. If a person blinks or looks away for even a second, they can miss a problem," Britton explained. "In contrast, machine vision is very diligent. It doesn't get tired or bored."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Why the Sony hack isn't big news in Japan

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A renewable bioplastic made from squid proteins

Dec 18, 2014

In the central Northern Pacific is an area that may be the size of Texas called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Made up of tons of floating plastic debris, the patch is killing seabirds and poisoning marine ...

That's a bioplastic wrap

Dec 15, 2014

Bioplastics take on traditional petrochemical plastics in food packaging, with some challenges.

Where there's muck there's aluminium (if not brass)

Dec 04, 2014

Technology developed at the University of Cambridge lies at the heart of a commercial process that can turn toothpaste tubes and drinks pouches into both aluminium and fuel in just three minutes.

Researchers develop inexpensive hydrolysable polymer

Dec 02, 2014

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have figured out how to reverse the characteristics of a key bonding material—polyurea—providing an inexpensive alternative for a broad number ...

Researchers find way to turn sawdust into gasoline

Nov 25, 2014

Researchers at KU Leuven's Centre for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis have successfully converted sawdust into building blocks for gasoline. Using a new chemical process, they were able to convert the cellulose ...

Recommended for you

California puzzles over safety of driverless cars

27 minutes ago

California's Department of Motor Vehicles will miss a year-end deadline to adopt new rules for cars of the future because regulators first have to figure out how they'll know whether "driverless" vehicles ...

Britain's UKIP issues online rules after gaffes

42 minutes ago

UK Independence Party (UKIP), the British anti-European Union party, has ordered a crackdown on the use of social media by supporters and members following a series of controversies.

Sony saga blends foreign intrigue, star wattage

52 minutes ago

The hackers who hit Sony Pictures Entertainment days before Thanksgiving crippled the network, stole gigabytes of data and spilled into public view unreleased films and reams of private and sometimes embarrassing ...

China's Xiaomi raises more than $1 bn in funding

1 hour ago

China's top smartphone seller Xiaomi Corp. is raising more than $1 billion in a fresh round of funding, a move which would raise its valuation above $45 billion, a report said Sunday.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.