FY -2C Satellite Ready For Full Operation

Jul 18, 2005

Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense held a handover ceremony on July 14 for China's first geostationary operational meteorological satellite successfully developed and launched by China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation.

After trial operation for six months, the satellite is officially delivered to China Meteorological Administration (CMA) for full operation.

Speaking at the ceremony, Sun Laiyan, deputy director of Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense and director general of the China National Space Administration (CNSA), said that the successful delivery marks a great leap forward of Chinese aerospace industry on its way to service-oriented practice from application and experiment based practice.

Zhang Qingwei, managing director of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, noted that FY - 2C is the third geostationary meteorological satellite China has ever launched. It employs the self-spin stabilization method and has a designed service life of three years.

The remote sensing instruments onboard the satellite could perform the 36,000-km high-altitude observation over the earth, which is of high time resolution and has an advantage in dynamically monitoring the disastrous weather caused by meso- and micro-scale weather system. Meanwhile, FY - 2C is also good at obtaining and transmitting data, enabling continuous meteorological monitoring over the earth.

Qin Dahe, director of CMA, note that China has so far established polar orbit and stationary operation series of meteorological satellites, among which the FY meteorological satellites have all been included into the World Meteorological Organisation Satellite Observation Network, with China's meteorological satellites to be the key members.

Starting from June 27, the flood season observation pattern of FY - 2C has been started, which can catch 48 relevant images every day.

Source: Xinhua News Agency

Copyright 2005 by Space Daily, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Mysteries of space dust revealed

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA sees Typhoon Rammasun exit the Philippines

Jul 16, 2014

Typhoon Rammasun passed through the central Philippines overnight and NASA satellite imagery showed that the storm's center moved into the South China Sea. NASA's TRMM satellite showed the soaking rains that Rammasun brought ...

NASA sees Tropical Storm 9 over Guam

Jul 11, 2014

Guam and surrounding areas were under a Tropical Storm Warning and Watch on July 11 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. During the early morning hours on July 11, Tropical Depression 09W strengthened ...

Recommended for you

Mysteries of space dust revealed

Aug 29, 2014

The first analysis of space dust collected by a special collector onboard NASA's Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006 suggests the tiny specks open a door to studying the origins of the ...

A guide to the 2014 Neptune opposition season

Aug 29, 2014

Never seen Neptune? Now is a good time to try, as the outermost ice giant world reaches opposition this weekend at 14:00 Universal Time (UT) or 10:00 AM EDT on Friday, August 29th. This means that the distant ...

How can we find tiny particles in exoplanet atmospheres?

Aug 29, 2014

It may seem like magic, but astronomers have worked out a scheme that will allow them to detect and measure particles ten times smaller than the width of a human hair, even at many light-years distance.  ...

Spitzer telescope witnesses asteroid smashup

Aug 28, 2014

(Phys.org) —NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has spotted an eruption of dust around a young star, possibly the result of a smashup between large asteroids. This type of collision can eventually lead to the ...

User comments : 0