Motorola's OFDM Can Support 300 Mbps Mobile Broadband Data Rates in The Next Generation of Heterogeneous Wireless Networ

Jul 27, 2004

Motorola Inc. (NYSE:MOT), by combining results from field experiments and research conducted by Motorola Labs, has proven existing Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) technology can support high-speed mobile networks with a peak downlink speed of up to 300 Mbps. This research demonstrates that future all-IP mobile networks using OFDM technology have the capability to provide a broadband user experience that was previously thought to be unattainable.



"Motorola Labs, through extensive research and field tests over the past four years has established OFDM as a key technology in the next generation of heterogeneous wireless networks," said Padmasree Warrior, chief technology officer, Motorola. "The promise of affordable, available mobile broadband is driving Motorola's vision of seamless mobility."

Motorola Labs recently completed a series of mobile wide area broadband wireless field experiments using OFDM on a 20 MHz bandwidth channel with multiple antenna handheld devices. Applying data from the field experiments in laboratory tests, Motorola Labs validated that a 20 MHz mobile OFDM channel can support peak uncoded channel data rates of up to 300 Mbps.

The field tests of Motorola Labs’ mobile OFDM system were conducted in the greater Chicago area in both urban and suburban environments. In the field tests Motorola Labs attained data throughputs exceeding 20 Mbps with a latency of just 25 milliseconds while simultaneously demonstrating real-time applications including videoconferencing, multi-Mbps streaming video, and voice over IP and traveling at typical highway speeds (in excess of 100 kilometers per hour or 62 mph).

The promise of faster wireless networks that can meet the demand for mobile broadband that supports multi-media applications has great appeal to operators.

“As the telecomm industry becomes more complex and competitive, operators need to get the most efficiency and speed from their networks while delivering a superior end user experience at a greatly reduced cost per bit,” said Adrian Nemcek, president and chief executive officer of Motorola’s Global Telecom Solutions Sector. “Several leading telecom operators from around the world have witnessed our continuing OFDM field trials in Chicago and have been favorably impressed with the performance. “

Motorola will be sharing its OFDM research experience in cooperation with IEEE, ITU, ETSI, 3GPP and 3GPP2, and will be an active contributor in introducing OFDM to the standards bodies. Motorola also recently joined the WiMAX Forum as a principal member. The WiMAX Forum promotes and certifies compatibility of wireless broadband products based on the IEEE 802.16 standards.

In addition to its research and development of OFDM solutions, Motorola’s wireless broadband access portfolio includes market-ready solutions for:
• CDMA2000 1x EV-DO
• High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA)
• WiFi
• Canopy™ broadband wireless portfolio

Editor’s Note
OFDM is a radio technology that combines time and frequency multiplexing to implement extremely high data rate wireless systems efficiently. It is currently being adopted for fixed and nomadic broadband wireless applications such as WiFi and WiMAX, and is being studied for use in the next generation of cellular equipment.

The combination of OFDM with other technologies is seen as a key enabler of the next generation of wide area broadband wireless systems. Some of those other technologies include adaptive modulation and coding (AMC), fast automatic repeat request (hybrid ARQ), multiple antenna techniques, advanced error control coding techniques (turbo and LDPC coding) and a unified approach to system development.

Motorola Labs also is conducting research into physical layer, data link layer, medium access control, network and system designs for future broadband cellular, public and private wide-area wireless systems. These systems, broadly characterized as the next generation wireless service after 3G, have additional applications into public and private systems. These systems are expected to have sustained data rates beyond 20 Mbps, and peak data rates upwards of 100 Mbps. Motorola has published reports and papers on its research in OFDM and these topics at several IEEE conferences and in journal publications. A reference list is available.

For more information about Motorola Labs please visit: www.motorola.com/content/0,,258-841,00.html


Explore further: Entrepreneur builds a sleek ship, but will anyone buy it?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Double antennas deliver double the signal

Nov 26, 2007

Digital TV transmission techniques that deliver most benefit in the worst reception environments have been developed by a consortium of European researchers. The technologies promise to reduce the network infrastructure needed ...

Clearwire Corp. secures $900M

Jul 12, 2006

Clearwire Corporation has secured $900 million in the financing round, led by Intel Capital, the investment arm for the Intel Corporation.

Recommended for you

Cyclist's helmet, Volvo car to communicate for safety

14 hours ago

Volvo calls it "a wearable life-saving wearable cycling tech concept." The car maker is referring to a connected car and helmet prototype that enables two-way communication between Volvo drivers and cyclists ...

California puzzles over safety of driverless cars

15 hours ago

California's Department of Motor Vehicles will miss a year-end deadline to adopt new rules for cars of the future because regulators first have to figure out how they'll know whether "driverless" vehicles ...

Britain's UKIP issues online rules after gaffes

15 hours ago

UK Independence Party (UKIP), the British anti-European Union party, has ordered a crackdown on the use of social media by supporters and members following a series of controversies.

Sony saga blends foreign intrigue, star wattage

15 hours ago

The hackers who hit Sony Pictures Entertainment days before Thanksgiving crippled the network, stole gigabytes of data and spilled into public view unreleased films and reams of private and sometimes embarrassing ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.