Laser metrology on the agenda at Cranfield University

Jul 11, 2005

Two exciting announcements were the highlights of the Laser Metrology and Machine Performance (LAMDAMAP) 2005 conference, hosted by Cranfield University in July which also featured Professor Bob Hocken of North Carolina University, USA, as keynote speaker.
The first was that Cranfield University has just delivered an initial set of spectrometer optics for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, Hubble’s replacement, as part of a project which will see the university enhance its reputation as a developer and producer of space optics.

Not only this, but a laser-based measuring technique developed by Cranfield has just been adopted as the standard technique for measuring the mid infra red instrument spectrometer optics employed on the James Webb Space Telescope.

The conference, coordinated by the european society for precision engineering and nanotechnology (euspen), was attended by over 100 delegates from 17 countries. Papers were delivered on the latest technology and techniques for assessing the performance of machine tools and measuring machines, and Professor Hotoshi Ohmori of RIKEN and Emeritus Professor Pat McKeown of Cranfield University, were among the well-respected presenters.

Conference Chairman Professor Paul Shore said: "LAMDAMAP has been a very successful international machine tool and metrology event, and has been an excellent opportunity for Cranfield to highlight its manufacturing and metrology activities in support of the next generation space telescope, the Hubble replacement."

For further information about euspen, please visit www.euspen.com
For further information abut LAMDAMAP, please visit www.lamdamap.com

Source: Cranfield University

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