How a baby's nose knows Mom's scent

Jul 06, 2005

For newborn mammals, including humans, identifying Mom by her odor can be critical to maternal bonding and survival. However, researchers have not understood how this odor identification develops. Now, Kevin Franks and Jeffry Isaacson of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report in the July 7, 2005, issue of Neuron that this process develops in basically the same way that newborns' developing visual systems learn to recognize the world. That is, during a critical early period, the infant's olfactory circuitry wires itself as a result of experiencing Mom's odor.

In their initial experiments with rat brains, the researchers identified two receptors, called AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors, as the key components of the olfactory circuitry that undergoes such early olfactory adaptation.

Such receptors are proteins embedded in the "receiving stations" of neurons and are activated by chemical signals called neurotransmitters--in this case, the neurotransmitter glutamate. Alterations in the relative numbers of such receptors "tune" neurons to be more or less likely to be triggered by neurotransmitters. Thus, such changes in networks of neurons can lay down the preferred neural pathways that constitute learning.

The researchers found in studies of rat brain tissue that as newborn rats aged, the fraction of NMDA receptors tended to go down in a brain olfactory processing region called the lateral olfactory tract. This reduction tended to activate connections among neurons in the region.

To explore whether sensory experience affected this process, the researchers plugged one nostril of newborn rats--thus depriving one side of the rat brain of olfactory input. This technique enabled them to compare, in the same animal's brain, changes in olfactory development with and without odor input.

The researchers found that during a critical period of a few weeks after birth, the olfactory-deprived side of the animals' brains showed a decrease in NMDA receptor activity compared to the spared side. This relative reduction of NMDA receptor activity caused the neurons to become more active, since AMPA receptors convert neurons to those that are more functional and less "silent."

The researchers also found evidence that the changes in the olfactory neurons during this critical period tended to render the animals' early olfactory experience more salient, reducing the significance of odors experienced later in development.

Source: Cell Press

Explore further: Changing dinosaur tracks spurs novel approach

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

How cells in the nose detect odors

Nov 14, 2012

The human nose has millions of olfactory neurons grouped into hundreds of different neuron types. Each of these neuron types expresses only one odorant receptor, and all neurons expressing the same odorant ...

Recommended for you

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

3 hours ago

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the ...

Can new understanding avert tragedy?

6 hours ago

As a boy growing up in Syracuse, NY, Sol Hsiang ran an experiment for a school project testing whether plants grow better sprinkled with water vs orange juice. Today, 20 years later, he applies complex statistical ...

Crowd-sourcing Britain's Bronze Age

7 hours ago

A new joint project by the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology is seeking online contributions from members of the public to enhance a major British Bronze Age archive and artefact collection.

Roman dig 'transforms understanding' of ancient port

7 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Researchers from the universities of Cambridge and Southampton have discovered a new section of the boundary wall of the ancient Roman port of Ostia, proving the city was much larger than previously ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the ...

Can new understanding avert tragedy?

As a boy growing up in Syracuse, NY, Sol Hsiang ran an experiment for a school project testing whether plants grow better sprinkled with water vs orange juice. Today, 20 years later, he applies complex statistical ...

Crowd-sourcing Britain's Bronze Age

A new joint project by the British Museum and the UCL Institute of Archaeology is seeking online contributions from members of the public to enhance a major British Bronze Age archive and artefact collection.

Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

Up to now, HONO, also known as nitrous acid, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which are regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. ...

Turning off depression in the brain

Scientists have traced vulnerability to depression-like behaviors in mice to out-of-balance electrical activity inside neurons of the brain's reward circuit and experimentally reversed it – but there's ...