Women feel pain more often than men

Jul 06, 2005

Women feel pain more than men -- the opposite of widely held beliefs that men are more susceptible to pain, British researchers at the University of Bath say.

Researchers examined 98 males and females whose arms were put in cold water. They said women feel pain more often in more areas and for longer periods than men.

"Until fairly recently it was controversial to suggest that there were any differences between males and females in the perception and experience of pain, but that is no longer the case," said lead researcher Ed Keogh.

While most research has focused on genetic or hormonal differences between men and women, Keogh said social and psychological factors also play a role.

Most women tend to focus on the emotional aspects of pain while men focus on the sensory aspects, which may help men increase their tolerance of pain, he said.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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