States urged to continue anti-tobacco ads

Jul 06, 2005

Teenagers who are exposed to state-sponsored anti-tobacco advertising are less likely to smoke, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers said Tuesday.

The study, reported in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, said students in states who had seen at least one anti-tobacco ad in the previous four months were 8 percent less likely to have smoked cigarettes in the past 30 days.

"Our analyses suggest that state-sponsored anti-tobacco media campaigns were associated with more favorable anti-smoking attitudes and beliefs among youth and reduced youth smoking," researchers said.

They urged states, many of which have cut anti-tobacco advertising to ease budget crunches, to make sure teens see at least one anti-tobacco ad every four months.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: A two generation lens: Current state policies fail to support families with young children

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