World's most powerful diode pumped solid state laser

Jul 05, 2005
World's most powerful diode pumped solid state laser

A revolutionary new laser under development at DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory could drastically reduce casualties by U.S. forces.
The Solid State Heat Capacity Laser program has already successfully achieved world-record energy output.

The system will eventually allow infantry units to use a beam of invisible light to destroy incoming mortars, artillery shells and anti-tank missiles, as well as defusing buried landmines.

The Army's Space and Missile Defense Command is sponsoring the program, which uses a unique pulsed beam that fires 200 times per second, and can already easily burn a hole through an inch of carbon steel in approximately seven seconds.

Related link: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Source: DOE Pulse

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