Giant sarcophagus found in Egypt

Jun 28, 2005

The Egyptian Ministry of Culture Tuesday announced the discovery of a giant granite sarcophagus in an ancient cemetery in Sakara, outside Cairo.

It said the sarcophagus which belonged to a top official who served under Pharaoh Ramses II, is decorated with colored paintings and hieroglyphic inscriptions as well as the titled carried by the man such as "the general supervisor of the royal stables."

The sarcophagus dates back to the period between 1304 and 1237 BC.

Egyptian archaeologists found the sarcophagus in the Haram Onas cemetery near the Sakara pyramids, some 23 kilometers (14 miles) south of Cairo.

The ministry said human bones and skulls as well as 100 figurines, a blue talisman and two pottery containers were also found in the cemetery.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Liberal democracy is possible in Muslim-majority countries

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

When it comes to how pizza looks, cheese matters

5 hours ago

Most consumers have an idea what they want their pizza slice to look like. Golden cheese with that dark toasted-cheese color scattered in distinct blistery patches across the surface with a bit of oil glistening in the valleys. ...

Freedom and responsibility of science

11 hours ago

Yesterday, the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Leopoldina National Academy of Sciences presented their recommendations for "The Freedom and Responsibility of Science" in Berlin. Both research organizations appeal ...

Feeling bad at work can be a good thing

15 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Research by the University of Liverpool suggests that, contrary to popular opinion, it can be good to feel bad at work, whilst feeling good in the workplace can also lead to negative outcomes.

User comments : 0