Giant sarcophagus found in Egypt

Jun 28, 2005

The Egyptian Ministry of Culture Tuesday announced the discovery of a giant granite sarcophagus in an ancient cemetery in Sakara, outside Cairo.

It said the sarcophagus which belonged to a top official who served under Pharaoh Ramses II, is decorated with colored paintings and hieroglyphic inscriptions as well as the titled carried by the man such as "the general supervisor of the royal stables."

The sarcophagus dates back to the period between 1304 and 1237 BC.

Egyptian archaeologists found the sarcophagus in the Haram Onas cemetery near the Sakara pyramids, some 23 kilometers (14 miles) south of Cairo.

The ministry said human bones and skulls as well as 100 figurines, a blue talisman and two pottery containers were also found in the cemetery.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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