Japanese police team up with Microsoft to fight cyberspace crime

Jun 28, 2005

US computer software giant Microsoft said Tuesday it will work with Japan's National Police Agency to fight rising crime in cyberspace.

Under the agreement, Microsoft will offer technical assistance to the police unit that investigates high-tech crimes.

At a symposium on Internet security, Microsoft chairman Bill Gates said partnership with the government was the key to prevent online fraud.

"For example, the police, they need to understand the software technology, what the bad guys might be doing using that," he said, adding there was "a need for a very strong dialogue" between high-tech firms and government.

The accord with the Japanese police is a "milestone" in cyberspace crime prevention, he said.

Gates said education of users was also important, noting that use of the latest technology alone could not provide a complete solution.

"We need to have users to have far more awareness about giving out confidential information, giving out their credit card (numbers), downloading software that may not be what it appears to be and how to use their system in a way that keeps them safe," he said.

Microsoft would not unveil details of the agreement. A company official said no money had been involved.

In 2004, Japan saw 2,081 cyberspace crimes, up 13 percent, police data showed. Some 91 percent of them were fraudulent cases involving computer networking systems.

(c) 2005 AFP

Explore further: HP supercomputer at NREL garners top honor

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

HP supercomputer at NREL garners top honor

9 minutes ago

A supercomputer created by Hewlett-Packard (HP) and the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that uses warm water to cool its servers, and then re-uses that water to heat its building, has been ...

Turner channels removed from Dish amid pact spat

29 minutes ago

Channels such as Cartoon Network and CNN are no longer part of Dish's programming lineup as a deadline has passed for the satellite TV provider and Turner Broadcasting to renew their distribution agreement.

Google's streaming music service adds mood to mix

29 minutes ago

Google's music-subscription service will try to anticipate its listeners' mood swings as it amplifies its competition with Pandora, Spotify and other popular services that play tunes over the Internet.

User comments : 0