Blue Planet Prize winners announced

Jun 27, 2005

Sir Nicholas Shackleton of the United Kingdom and Dr. Gordon Hisashi Sato of the United States have been named as the recipients of the 2005 Blue Planet Prize.

The Asahi Glass Foundation of Japan, which established the Blue Planet Prize in 1992, made the announcement Monday on its Web site.

Each year the Blue Planet Prize recognizes two individuals and/or organizations whose achievements have contributed to the resolution of global environmental problems. Each prize recipient receives $460,000.

Shackleton, emeritus professor at the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, contributed to palaeoclimatology, particularly in identifying the glacial-interglacial climatic cycles and identifying the role of carbon dioxide as well as changes in the Earth's orbit in causing them.

Sato, director emeritus of W. Alton Jones Cell Science Center Inc., developed a new mangrove planting technology in Eritrea and through its utilization showed the possibility of building a sustainable local community in the poorest area of the world.

The award ceremony will be held Oct. 19 in Tokyo, with the commemorative lectures by the prize recipients to be held at the United Nations University in Tokyo Oct. 20.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: After early troubles, all go for Milky Way telescope

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Physicists discuss quantum pigeonhole principle

6 hours ago

The pigeonhole principle: "If you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes at least two of the pigeons end up in the same hole." So where's the argument? Physicists say there is an important argument. While the ...

Giant crater in Russia's far north sparks mystery

8 hours ago

A vast crater discovered in a remote region of Siberia known to locals as "the end of the world" is causing a sensation in Russia, with a group of scientists being sent to investigate.

NASA Mars spacecraft prepare for close comet flyby

9 hours ago

NASA is taking steps to protect its Mars orbiters, while preserving opportunities to gather valuable scientific data, as Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring heads toward a close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19.

Recommended for you

Image: NASA's SDO observes a lunar transit

5 hours ago

On July 26, 2014, from 10:57 a.m. to 11:42 a.m. EDT, the moon crossed between NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit.

Image: Tethys in sunlight

5 hours ago

Tethys, like many moons in the solar system, keeps one face pointed towards the planet around which it orbits. Tethys' anti-Saturn face is seen here, fully illuminated, basking in sunlight. On the right side ...

User comments : 0