GOES-N Set For Launch

Jun 20, 2005

GOES-N, the latest in a series of Earth monitoring satellites, is set to launch on June 24, 2005, with a launch window between 6:13 p.m. – 6:58 p.m. EDT.

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) provide the kind of continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis.

Geostationary describes an orbit in which a satellite is always in the same position with respect to the rotating Earth.

This allows GOES to hover continuously over one position on the Earth's surface, appearing stationary. As a result, GOES provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric "triggers" for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms, and hurricanes.

The multimission GOES series N-P is the next series of satellites.

This series will be a vital contributor to weather, solar and space operations, and science. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are actively engaged in a cooperative program to expand the existing GOES system with the launch of the GOES N-P satellites.

GOES-N is the first in the new series of spacecraft.

Copyright 2005 by Space Daily, Distributed by United Press International

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