Software Advance Helps Computers Act Logically

Jun 16, 2005

Computers just respond to commands, never "thinking" about the consequences. A new software language, however, promises to enable computers to reason much more precisely and thus better reflect subtleties intended by commands of human operators. Developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) researchers and colleagues in France, Germany, Japan and the United Kingdom, the process specification language software, known as ISO 18629, should make computers much more useful in manufacturing.

ISO 18629 uses artificial intelligence (AI) and language analysis to represent computer commands in the context of a manufacturing plan. Researchers have incorporated approximately 300 concepts, such as “duration” and “sequence,” into its software structure. Computers using software with this expanded, though still primitive AI capacity, can act on a word’s “meaning,” interpreting a command almost like a person.

For instance, a person who hears the commands “paint it, before shipping it” and “turn on the coolant, before milling” understands that the word "before" has slightly different meanings in these two different contexts. In the first command, it is understood that painting and drying must be completed prior to the next action, shipping. In the second command, however, the first action, turning on the coolant, continues after the milling starts. ISO 18629 supports computer systems with this type of rudimentary understanding of context-specific language.

The ISO 18629 language is especially suited for the exchange of process planning, validation, production scheduling and control information for guiding manufacturing processes. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO), which already has approved six sections of the fledging standard, is currently reviewing the last of its three sections. Once the expected ISO approval is given, software vendors will begin building a variety of manufacturing systems that conform to ISO 18629.

Source: NIST

Explore further: On the way to a safe and secure smart home

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

3 Questions: Removing barriers to the Web

Oct 22, 2012

During the opening ceremonies of this summer's Olympic games in London, a musical performance culminated with a stage-set house rising into the rafters to reveal Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World ...

C++ celebrates its 25th anniversary

Oct 15, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Oct. 14 marked the 25th anniversary of the commercial release of the programming language C++, which was designed and implemented by Dr. Bjarne Stroustrup, Distinguished Professor and College ...

Recommended for you

On the way to a safe and secure smart home

2 minutes ago

A growing number of household operations can be managed via the Internet. Today's "Smart Home" promises efficient building management. But often the systems are not secure and can only be retrofitted at great ...

Protecting privacy also means preserving democracy

2 hours ago

What impact does the proliferation of new mobile technologies have? How does the sharing of personal data over the Internet threaten our society? Interview with Professor Jean-Pierre Hubaux, a specialist ...

Storing solar energy

2 hours ago

A research project conducted by Leclanché S.A., the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Romande Energie and with the financial support of the Canton of Vaud could bring a real added value in ...

Sony wooing Japanese to PS4 with Dragon Quest

3 hours ago

Sony is trying to woo Japanese game fans to the PlayStation 4 home console that went on sale in November in the U.S. and Europe, but didn't arrive at stores here until February.

User comments : 0