Epson and Fujitsu Announce Joint Development of Next-Generation Technology for FRAM Non-Volatile Memory

Jun 15, 2005

Seiko Epson Corporation and Fujitsu Limited today announced their agreement for joint development of next-generation technology for Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FRAM) non-volatile memory.

FRAM (Ferroelectric Random Access Memory): Non-volatile memory that uses a ferroelectric film on the capacitor for data retention. This memory technology features advantages of both ROM and RAM, such as high-speed data read/write functions, low power consumption, and virtually unlimited read/write cycles.

Non-volatile memory: Memory that retains data even when a device is switched off.

According to the agreement, the two companies plan to develop highly integrated next-generation FRAM that is one-sixth the cell area of conventional FRAMs on the market, targeting completion in the first half of 2006. Epson and Fujitsu also plan to develop memory core process technology that features minimal constraints on the number of read/write cycles that can be executed.

In recent years, portable information devices and intelligent home appliances have become increasingly sophisticated. As a result, demand for FRAM non-volatile memory has rapidly increased, as it fulfills a wide range of market needs such as low power consumption and high read/write speeds with greater advantages compared to flash memory and Electrically Erasable and Programmable Read Only Memory (EEPROM). FRAM features non-volatile RAM functions in addition to ROM functions, thereby making it one of the best memory devices available and an ideal memory solution for system Large-Scaled Integrated circuits (LSIs).

Through their joint development of next-generation FRAM technology, the two companies plan to combine their elemental technologies, such as for FRAM materials and miniaturization processes, to enable shorter development periods.

EEPROM (Electrically Erasable and Programmable Read Only Memory): Read only nonvolatile memory capable of being erased and rewritten electrically.

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