mPhase Exhibits its Nanobattery and Magnetometer Technology

Jun 08, 2005

mPhase Technologies, Inc. described its breakthrough nanobattery design and its ultra-sensitive magnetometers this week at Sensors Expo in Chicago, Illinois. Company personnel at the booth described the technology to potential users of both its novel nano-structured materials-based battery now under development, and its prototype ultra-sensitive magnetometer. mPhase is collaborating with Lucent Technologies Bell Labs to commercialize the technology developed by Bell Labs researchers.

The mPhase nanobattery design permits a high degree of integration with sensor electronics. Combining silicon fabrication with embedded power sources has the potential to enable "sensor on a chip" applications that could incorporate circuits for detecting motion, gas or liquids, temperature and other environmental conditions. This creates a small form factor that is ideally suited for remote placement in areas lacking electricity.

"The sensor market has the greatest opportunity for the capabilities we're developing," noted Ron Durando, the CEO of mPhase Technologies Inc. "Our nanobattery architecture with its long shelf life and ability to be scaled down to very small sizes allows levels of integration not possible with conventional technology. In addition, the extreme sensitivity of our prototype magnetometer can be used for many metal detection applications such as perimeter monitoring. "

Mr. Durando noted that the Sensors Expo included companies developing sensor applications in all the following fields: asset management, environmental monitoring, data acquisition, industrial automation networks, and safety and security.

According to the organizers of Sensors Expo, the worldwide sensors market is expected to exceed $15 billion by 2008. Sensors Expo & Conference, held from June 6 to 8, at McCormick Place is the leading sensors event in North America and featured a conference program that includes physical sensors, sensor networks, biosensors, MEMS and nanotechnology, instrumentation and controls, intelligent systems, machine-to-machine communication, wireless sensing and IT technology. For more information on the Sensors Expo visit www.sensorsexpo.com

Explore further: New absorber will lead to better biosensors

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