New Low-Power Intel Pentium M And Intel Celeron M Processors

Jul 20, 2004

Intel Corporation today expanded the Intel® Pentium® M processor and Intel® Celeron® M processor families with products aimed at the mini-notebook, sub-notebook and tablet PC segments that represent small mobile PCs typically weighing around 3 pounds.

Intel Corporation today expanded the Intel® Pentium® M processor and Intel® Celeron® M processor families with products aimed at the mini-notebook, sub-notebook and tablet PC segments that represent small mobile PCs typically weighing around 3 pounds.

The Low Voltage and Ultra Low Voltage Intel Pentium M processors, in conjunction with the Intel 855 chipset family and the Intel PRO/Wireless network connection family, are key components of Intel Centrino mobile technology for mini-notebooks, sub-notebooks and tablet PCs. These new low voltage Intel Pentium M processors feature such architectural enhancements as a 2MB Level 2 cache, a power-optimized 400 MHz system bus, and enhanced data pre-fetcher and enhanced register access manager for fast execution of instructions at low power. These new processors also include Enhanced Intel Speedstep® Technology, which helps optimize application performance and power consumption to enable extended battery life.

The Intel Celeron M processor Ultra Low Voltage 353 offers users a balanced level of mobile-optimized processor technology and exceptional value for small mobile PCs. Intel Celeron M processors are compatible with the Intel 855 chipset family as well as the Intel 852GM chipset to enable cost-effective, scalable platforms for system manufacturers.

The original press release can be found here.

Explore further: Freight train industry to miss safety deadline

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

HPC means business in Cray XC30-A supercomputer debut

May 08, 2013

(Phys.org) —What better place to use the "new vintage" computing theme than in Napa Valley where the Cray User Group meeting took place on Tuesday, The tie-in this year is Cray's new vintage of supercomputers ...

Samsung will open up on big.LITTLE processor at ISSCC

Nov 21, 2012

(Phys.org)—Samsung will turn heads at the IEEE International Solid State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) in February when it describes the first mobile applications processor to use ARM's big.LITTLE concept. ...

Intel workers have Android Jelly Bean on Atom phones

Sep 14, 2012

(Phys.org)—Intel watchers by now understand the quick version of Intel's to-do list: Join and grow up in smartphone market universe, fire up Ultrabooks and, by both means, show better profit outlook. Intel ...

Smart headlights let drivers see between the raindrops

Jul 04, 2012

(Phys.org) -- A Carnegie Mellon professor and his team have developed a prototype headlight system, or “smart headlights” designed to help you make your way safely home if driving through a downpour ...

HP picks Intel's Centerton for low-power server rollout

Jun 22, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Hewlett-Packard has a longer term message that reaches over all company announcements. HP wants the world to know that, never mind hasty CEO exits and entrances, never mind killing off brand-conscious ...

Recommended for you

Net neutrality balancing act

2 hours ago

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Net neutrality balancing act

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...

Bionic ankle 'emulates nature'

These days, Hugh Herr, an associate professor of media arts and sciences at MIT, gets about 100 emails daily from people across the world interested in his bionic limbs.