Infineon Announces High-Speed and High-Density DDR2 Memory Modules for High-Performance Computing Products

May 11, 2005

Infineon Technologies AG today announced new high-speed DDR2 modules for high-end desktops and servers:
-- Selected as Preferred Supplier by Asus for DDR2-800 unbuffered DIMMs
-- Customized 8GB (Gigabyte) DDR2-400 Tall registered DIMMs based on dual-die technology

The Infineon DDR2 DRAM components, based on DRAM trench technology, require lower array voltage to store electrical charges compared to stacked DRAM. This results in advantages for heat- and power-sensitive applications, such as high-density server systems and notebooks.

Infineon introduces DDR2-800 unbuffered DIMMs for the high-performance PC market – Selected as Preferred Supplier by Asus

Infineon demonstrates its leadership as memory supplier with the early introduction of DDR2-800 memory modules for the high-performance PC market and was selected ‘preferred supplier’ by Asus for its 512MB (Megabyte) DDR2-800 unbuffered DIMMs. Combining those DIMMs with the DDR2-800 capability of Asus' P5WD2 Premium motherboard, the whole system allows computer enthusiasts to maximize desktop performance with a DIMM bandwidth of 6.4GB/s.

“We are very pleased that the test result of the Infineon modules allowed us to successfully break the chipset limitations to reach extreme system performance,” said Joe Hsieh, Director of ASUS' Motherboard Business.

The Infineon 512MB DDR2-800 unbuffered DIMMs increase data throughput of desktop PCs by around 20 percent compared to current high-performance memory modules and perfectly match with the most advanced processor front-side bus. They are designed for end-users who do not want to overclock their systems. Due to the industry leading low power features of its DDR2 memory products, Infineon is the only DRAM supplier who abandons the usage of an extra heatspreader which is standard for high speed modules with data rates of 800Mbit/s.

Infineon offers DDR2-800 unbuffered modules with densities of 256MB and 512MB. The 256MB and 512MB modules are based on Infineon's 256Mbit DDR2 components. Samples of the 256MB and 512MB modules are available for customers now. Volume production is planned to start in June 2005.

Customized 8GB DDR2-400 Tall Registered DIMMs based on dual-die technology

Infineon is sampling dual-die-based 8GB DDR2-400 Tall Registered DIMMs for proprietary server applications which are not based on Intel- or AMD-chipsets. The new module consists of 36 dual-die-based 2Gbit (Gigabit) DDR2 components, realized by stacking two 1Gbit DDR2 SDRAMs in one package. Dual-die technology allows doubling of the maximum memory density while increasing component height by only 0.1mm. With a 4.1mm module thickness and 55mm height, the 8GB DDR2-400 Tall registered DIMMs are about 40 percent thinner than comparable solutions, hence outperforming customers’ requirements for stacked solutions. Thinner modules are beneficial for airflow and thermal conditions in current high-end server systems. Thermal conditions are further improved by the use of the Infineon low-power DDR2 components.

Explore further: Windows Insiders can try out Project Spartan browser

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