Davidson recognized for contributions to beam physics

May 09, 2005

Ronald Davidson, a researcher at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, has been selected to receive the Particle Accelerator Science and Technology Award for 2005. He will be honored on May 18 during the biennial Particle Accelerator Conference in Knoxville, Tenn.

The award, which recognizes Davidson for his important contributions to beam physics, is sponsored by a committee of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society. It includes a plaque and $2,000.

Davidson is deputy head of the theory department and head of the beam dynamics and nonneutral plasma division at the PPPL. He also is a professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton and the deputy director of the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion, a collaborative effort between the PPPL, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

He earned his Ph.D. in plasma physics from Princeton in 1966 and joined the PPPL in 1991, serving as director of the lab until 1997.

Explore further: Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tailored 'activity coaching' by smartphone

2 hours ago

Today's smartphone user can obtain a lot of data about his or her health, thanks to built-in or separate sensors. Researcher Harm op den Akker of the University of Twente (CTIT Institute) now takes this health ...

Chemists tackle battery overcharge problem

2 hours ago

Research from the University of Kentucky Department of Chemistry will help batteries resist overcharging, improving the safety of electronics from cell phones to airplanes.

Operation IceBridge turns five

2 hours ago

In May 2014, two new studies concluded that a section of the land-based West Antarctic ice sheet had reached a point of inevitable collapse. Meanwhile, fresh observations from September 2014 showed sea ice ...

A newborn supernova every night

2 hours ago

Thanks to a $9 million grant from the National Science Foundation and matching funds from the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) collaboration, a new camera is being built at Caltech's Palomar Observatory that ...

Recommended for you

Wild molecular interactions in a new hydrogen mixture

2 hours ago

Hydrogen—the most abundant element in the cosmos—responds to extremes of pressure and temperature differently. Under ambient conditions hydrogen is a gaseous two-atom molecule. As confinement pressure ...

Scientists create possible precursor to life

4 hours ago

How did life originate? And can scientists create life? These questions not only occupy the minds of scientists interested in the origin of life, but also researchers working with technology of the future. ...

User comments : 0