Widespread use of high-temperature superconductors on horizon

Apr 29, 2005

From improvements in cellular base stations to the development of more efficient electric transmission lines and energy storage systems, high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are nearing their commercial viability.
Two-time University of Houston graduate, Venkat Selvamanickam, will present a special seminar – "Second-generation HTS Conductors" – from 3 to 4 p.m., Monday, May 2, in room 102 of the Houston Science Center at UH. Part of the Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials (TcSAM) Special Seminar series, the event is free and open to the public.

Promising to meet the price-performance characteristics needed for widespread use of HTS, second-generation HTS conductors will have applications not only in space-age transit but also in advanced MRIs and better transmission lines. Selvamanickam, who received his doctorate from UH in materials engineering and master's degree from UH in mechanical engineering, will discuss the latest developments in the scale-up R&D of second-generation HTS conductors, as well as detail the remaining challenges for successful use of HTS in commercial applications.

The discovery of high-temperature superconductors that can operate using inexpensive liquid nitrogen as a coolant has opened doors to applying superconductivity to electric power devices. These HTS devices offer both performance advantages and environmental benefits.

Selvamanickam, currently a program manager of materials technology at SuperPower Inc. in Schenectady, New York, recently was named "Superconductor Industry Person of the Year 2004." Awarded by Superconductor Week, the leading publication in superconductor business and technology, this honor is the industry's most prestigious international distinction in the development and commercialization of superconductors. Given to only two recipients each year, Selvamanickam was recognized for his leadership, quality R&D and advocacy in the field.

SuperPower Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Intermagnetics General Corporation, uses core capabilities in materials, cryogenics and magnetics to develop electric power components such as underground transmission and distribution cables, transformers and fault current limiters, utilizing state-of-the-art second-generation HTS technology.

Source: University of Houston

Explore further: Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean

9 hours ago

As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle ...

Underwater elephants

9 hours ago

In the high-tech world of science, researchers sometimes need to get back to basics. UC Santa Barbara's Douglas McCauley did just that to study the impacts of the bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) on cor ...

Recommended for you

Refocusing research into high-temperature superconductors

6 hours ago

Below a specific transition temperature superconductors transmit electrical current nearly loss-free. For the best of the so-called high-temperature superconductors, this temperature lies around -180 °C – a temperature ...

MRI for a quantum simulation

11 hours ago

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, is a powerful diagnostic tool. MRI works by resonantly exciting hydrogen atoms and measuring ...

50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet installed at Fermilab

11 hours ago

One year ago, the 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet arrived at the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois after traveling 3,200 miles over land and sea from Long Island, ...

User comments : 0