BAE Systems and Nantero, Inc. Announce Joint Evaluation of the Potential of Carbon Nanotube-based Electronics

Jul 14, 2004

Nantero, Inc. and BAE Systems announced today a joint effort to evaluate the potential to develop carbon nanotube-based electronic devices for use in advanced defense and aerospace systems. The project will involve research and development of a variety of next-generation electronic devices that can be built leveraging the unique properties of carbon nanotubes and using Nantero’s proprietary methods and processes for the design and manufacture of nanotube-based electronics.

Nantero’s proprietary processes for the use of carbon nanotubes are CMOS-compatible, allowing the development to be carried out in BAE Systems Manassas’ newly modernized production semiconductor fabrication facilities.

“BAE Systems is a recognized leader in defense and aerospace systems, and they are continuing their tradition of technical innovation by becoming pioneers in nanotube-based electronics through this project," said Greg Schmergel, Nantero’s co-founder and CEO. "We are very pleased to be working together with them towards the goal of enabling more robust and higher performance systems in the near future.”

“Nantero’s carbon nanotube-based technology has multiple applications throughout the field of electronics, with the potential to provide many performance benefits including greatly reduced power consumption and substantially enhanced radiation tolerance,” noted George Nossaman, director, Space Communications Systems and Electronics for BAE Systems at Manassas.

“By combining their expertise and intellectual property in nanotube-based designs and processes with our advanced semiconductor processing capabilities and leadership position in the defense and aerospace market, we expect to be able to deliver breakthrough products to our customers.”

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