mPhase to Report on Battery, Sensor Applications at Stephens Inc. 2005 Nanotechnology Investors Conference

Apr 05, 2005

mPhase Technologies Inc. today announced that Steve Simon, executive vice president of research and development, will report on the company's latest nanotechnology milestones at the Stephens Inc. 2005 Nanotechnology Investors Conference on Wednesday, April 6. Simon will focus on the progress made in commercializing a power cell based on nanostructures, as well as the company's latest foray into miniature metal detectors.

Under a year-old agreement with Bell Labs, the R&D arm of Lucent Technologies (NYSE:LU), mPhase has created a prototype battery based on a Bell Labs discovery that liquid droplets of electrolyte will stay in a dormant state atop microscopic structures called "nanograss" until stimulated to flow, thereby triggering a reaction producing electric current. Future batteries based on this technology have the potential to deliver far longer shelf life and better storage capacity than existing battery technology.

One of the many potential military and commercial uses for the nanobattery is a new generation of uncooled magnetic ultra-sensitive sensors that is the subject of a recently-announced expansion of the mPhase-Bell Labs relationship. The sensors, technically referred to as magnetometers, are based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), using designs based on fundamental breakthroughs made in the past few years at Bell Labs using the facilities of the New Jersey Nanotechnology Consortium (NJNC). Initial tests of these MEMS magnetometers indicate sensitivities 1000 times those achieved in presently available uncooled magnetometers. The resulting devices would be small, rugged, and inexpensive.

The live mPhase webcast is scheduled for 11:30 AM Eastern Time Wednesday, April 6. To listen to the presentation, interested investors must register at www.corporate-ir.net/ireye/con… XDSL&item_id=1046538 (Due to its length, this URL may need to be copied/pasted into your Internet browser's address field. Remove the extra space if one exists.)

Explore further: Understanding the source of extra-large capacities in promising Li-ion battery electrodes

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