TI Intros Smallest, Single-Chip Battery Charger and DC/DC for Bluetooth Headsets

Mar 29, 2005

Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) announced today a highly integrated charge and power management device that combines a single-cell Li-Ion USB/AC charger with a high efficiency, synchronous DC/DC power converter. The simple-to-design integrated circuit (IC) supports a wide range of space-limited portable applications, such as BluetoothTM headsets and accessories.

TI's new bq25010 device gives portable designers the ability to charge a battery either from the AC adapter or USB with autonomous power source selection. The IC integrates a power FET and current sensor to deliver up to 500-mA, while the USB charge control limits the USB current to 100-mA or 500-mA.

The bq25010 also incorporates a 100-mA step-down DC/DC converter for high power efficiency. Under nominal load current, operating at a fixed switching frequency of 1 MHz, the device achieves up to 95 percent conversion efficiency. At lighter load currents, it enters a "power save mode" with reduced switching frequency and a minimum quiescent current to maintain high efficiency. The converter also operates directly from the battery and regulates the output voltage, even when the input supply is removed.

In addition to the integrated battery charger, Bluetooth headset designers can take advantage of longer talk time using TI's 50-mW stereo headphone driver, TPA6100A2. The amplifier supports an input voltage range of 1.6 V to 3.6 V, offering a low supply current of 0.75 mA and shutdown current of only 50 nA. The TPA6100A2 amplifier also provides excellent audio quality by achieving total harmonic distortion plus noise as low as 0.04 percent at 1 kHz.

Explore further: Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Making 'bucky-balls' in spin-out's sights

7 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A new Oxford spin-out firm is targeting the difficult challenge of manufacturing fullerenes, known as 'bucky-balls' because of their spherical shape, a type of carbon nanomaterial which, like ...

Physicists create new nanoparticle for cancer therapy

5 hours ago

A University of Texas at Arlington physicist working to create a luminescent nanoparticle to use in security-related radiation detection may have instead happened upon an advance in photodynamic cancer therapy.

Scientists see urgent need for reducing emissions

Apr 15, 2014

(Phys.org) —The bad news: a major transformation of our current energy supply system is needed in order to avoid a dangerous increase in global temperatures. The good news: the technologies needed to get ...

Recommended for you

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

3 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Within each strand of DNA lies the blueprint for building an organism, along with the keys to its evolution and survival. These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why pathogens like Cryptococcus ne ...