Physicists find patterns within seemingly random events of physiological systems

Mar 18, 2005

Finding patterns behind seemingly random events is the signature of a recent trio of research studies coming from the statistical physics group in Boston University's Department of Physics. Although describing physical phenomenon is not a surprising industry for research physicists, findings from this BU group increasingly wed phenomena associated with the inanimate world to those of animate beings -- finding commonalities between stock markets fluctuations, earthquakes, and heart rates, for example, or discovering similarities in mice, men, and other mammals for such fundamental phenomena as wake periods during slumber.

Eugene Stanley, a professor of physics and director of BU's Center for Polymer Studies, Plamen Ivanov, a research associate in the Center, and Kun Hu, a research assistant in physics, will discuss their findings March 22 at the American Physical Society meeting in Los Angeles.

The team sought to investigate the role the body's internal clock, the circadian pacemaker, might have on heart performance either directly, through influencing cardiac dynamics such as heartbeat, or indirectly, through its influence on motor activity control. Their analyses of heartbeat dynamics from participants show a significant circadian rhythm, including a notable response at the circadian phase corresponding to 10 a.m., the time of day most often linked to adverse cardiac events in individuals with heart disease. Circadian rhythm, however, does not affect motor activity dynamics, according to their recent analyses, leading the researchers to speculate that the early-morning peak in cardiac risk is not related to circadian-mediated influences on motor activity.

In research on the dynamical features of the brief awakenings and sleep periods that occur in different mammalian species, the scientists found that the periods of wakefulness that snuggle between sleep periods of various mammalian species, are similar. The findings lead them to speculate that, instead of merely being random disruptions in the sleep cycle, periods of brief wakefulness exhibit what is known as self-organized criticality. This physical phenomenon is exhibited in events such as avalanches, where a system exists in a quiet state, accumulating energy, until it reaches a "tipping" point and collapses, only to build up again and repeat the cycle. The researchers, therefore, speculate that the dynamical patterns found in these wakefulness periods may hint at underlying similarities to the neural networks controlling mammalian sleep.

Scientists at Boston University's Center for Polymer Studies, part of BU's Department of Physics in the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, research polymer systems at the microscopic level, focusing on describing the basic spatial configurations of polymer molecules so as to better predict the macroscopic behavior of polymers. Interdisciplinary science research at the Center includes studies of cardiac dynamics, the statistical mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease, and simulations of liquid water.

Source: Boston University

Explore further: Detailed experiments reveal the operational parameters for a promising thermo-magnetic data-storage technology

Related Stories

Mathematicians model fluids at the mesoscale

Mar 06, 2015

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today's scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite ...

Bending—but not breaking—in search of new materials

Nov 11, 2014

Making a paper airplane in school used to mean trouble. Today it signals a promising discovery in materials science research that could help next-generation technology -like wearable energy storage devices- ...

Better diagnostic imaging for traumatic brain injuries

Oct 27, 2014

Image-calibration technology designed and developed by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute and the Radiological Society ...

Recommended for you

CERN researchers confirm existence of the Force

2 hours ago

Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider just recently started testing the accelerator for running at the higher energy of 13 TeV, and already they have found new insights into the fundamental structure ...

Soft, energy-efficient robotic wings

21 hours ago

Dielectric elastomers are novel materials for making actuators or motors with soft and lightweight properties that can undergo large active deformations with high-energy conversion efficiencies. This has ...

Trapping and watching motile cells

Mar 31, 2015

A new approach enables rapid characterization of living suspension cells in 4 dimensions while they are immobilized and manipulated within optical traps.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.