Cell Phone Calls Via Fixed-line Networks, Via Bluetooth

Mar 18, 2005
Cell Phone Calls Via Fixed-line Networks, Via Bluetooth

In the future, cell phone users will be able to use Bluetooth to telephone at home via fixed-line networks. At CeBIT, Siemens was demonstrating the solution on a cell phone to show how access to an ISDN fixed-line network is possible via the short-range digital radio standard.
This means cell phone users will also be able to use their mobile terminals at home for more attractively priced fixed-line rates, without having to pay special fees to their mobile communication providers. And it will still be possible to utilize all of the user’s settings and preferences, the appointment list and the device’s telephone book.

Users decide whether they would like to call at home with a cell phone or with the fixed-line telephone. And with the push of a button, users can switch their cell phones over to their fixed-line number, at which they can then accept and place telephone calls. To do this, the cell phone uses the Bluetooth Cordless Telephony Profile (CTP) to establish a connection with a Bluetooth access point. All that’s needed is to connect the receiving device to the fixed line. If the access point has an interface for VoIP and a DSL connection, then Internet telephony is also an option. But that’s not all: Surfing the Internet and using e-mail would also be possible. Siemens Communications is currently testing the software on a cell phone.

Explore further: Review: Galaxy S6 phones are Samsung's best yet

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Wearable device helps vision-impaired avoid collision

9 hours ago

People who have lost some of their peripheral vision, such as those with retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, or brain injury that causes half visual field loss, often face mobility challenges and increased likelihood ...

Yahoo boosts share buyback plan by $2 billion

9 hours ago

Yahoo on Thursday told US regulators that it will spend another $2 billion buying back shares as the pioneering US Internet search firm continues an effort to re-invent itself.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.