Jaguar Leaps into Luxury of Bluetooth Wireless Technology

Mar 14, 2005

Motorola, Inc. and Jaguar announced the availability of the Jaguar Bluetooth system – a new hands-free in-vehicle communication system using Bluetooth wireless technology – across all Jaguar 2005 model year vehicles.
Once a Jaguar owner completes a one time “pairing” between the Jaguar Bluetooth System and a Jaguar certified Bluetooth mobile phone, they can begin experiencing the convenience of hands-free and wire-free mobile phone calls while inside the car. With the wireless link established, the phone does not need to be physically connected to the vehicle. The phone can be left in a jacket or briefcase, for instance, enabling Jaguar owners to operate the in-vehicle communication system with ease.

Motorola designed the global hands-free communication platform that can be ordered from the factory or installed at the dealership. The Jaguar Bluetooth System is custom designed for Jaguar vehicles providing drivers with the ultimate level of integration. Once a Jaguar-approved mobile phone with Bluetooth wireless technology seamlessly connects with the Jaguar Bluetooth System, dependent on phone being used, the contact names and numbers from the mobile phone are downloaded into the system. Utilizing the integrated steering wheel and audio system controls, the driver can answer a call, scroll through phonebook entries where applicable or initiate a call. A Jaguar owner can also choose an optional voice recognition feature that enables the driver to place or receive calls with simple voice commands.

When a call is received by the Jaguar Bluetooth System, the name of the caller or phone number is displayed to the driver and the car stereo is automatically muted. If the driver chooses to accept the call, it is broadcast through the audio system inside the car. The system is specifically tuned to each vehicle and features Motorola’s advanced noise reduction and echo cancellation technology to deliver the optimal experience, so all calls are clear and background noise is minimal.

The Jaguar Bluetooth System is certified to work with a selection of Bluetooth enabled mobile phones.

Motorola and Jaguar are demonstrating the Jaguar Bluetooth System within Motorola’s booth (Hall D, Booth #3145) during CTIA WIRELESS 2005 being held in New Orleans, March 14-16.

Bluetooth is an international standard that allows electronic components to communicate with each other, using a short-range radio link. Bluetooth eliminates the need for wires or cables: typically, devices can communicate at a range of up to meters (33 feet).

Explore further: Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Molecular gate that could keep cancer cells locked up

6 hours ago

In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, ...

Taking great ideas from the lab to the fab

7 hours ago

A "valley of death" is well-known to entrepreneurs—the lull between government funding for research and industry support for prototypes and products. To confront this problem, in 2013 the National Science ...

SR Labs research to expose BadUSB next week in Vegas

7 hours ago

A Berlin-based security research and consulting company will reveal how USB devices can do damage that can conduct two-way malice, from computer to USB or from USB to computer, and can survive traditional ...

Recommended for you

Android grabs 85% of smartphone market: survey

9 hours ago

Smartphones powered by the Android operating system captured 85 percent of the worldwide market in the second quarter, threatening to marginalize rival platforms, a new survey shows.

Irish bookmaker apologizes for 2010 data breach

10 hours ago

(AP)—Irish betting company Paddy Power announced Thursday it is notifying hundreds of thousands of customers that most of their profile information was stolen in 2010, but hackers did not gain their credit card details ...

Misinformation diffusing online

12 hours ago

The spread of misinformation through online social networks is becoming an increasingly worrying problem. Researchers in India have now modeled how such fictions and diffuse through those networks. They described details ...

User comments : 0