Transform Pioneer's Professional Plasma Display Into The Ultimate Presentation Tool With New Touch Screen Device

Mar 10, 2005

At the Systems Integration Expo and Conference today, Pioneer Electronics (USA) Inc. introduced the PDK-50HW3 touch screen device designed to add touch screen capability to Pioneer’s industry-leading 50-inch professional plasma displays. When the device is used with third party touch screen software it can transform most of Pioneer’s 50-inch professional PureVision plasma displays into high resolution touch-screen monitors, creating the ultimate interactive tool at the office, in an information kiosk, on a showroom floor or for promotional purposes. Unlike other touch screen devices, the newly designed PDK-50HW3 is USB powered offering a one-wire solution for data and power. Since it is a bezel and not an overlay, the image quality remains crystal clear. It also comes equipped with a state of the art mouse pen.

“Transforming a 50-inch professional plasma display into a 50-inch touch panel display gives users that interactive experience traditionally accomplished with small screen displays,” said Jim Krodel, director of professional display products for Pioneer Electronics (USA) Inc. “Pioneer’s industry-leading professional plasma displays are an effective tool for multiple display applications. Whether they are used for digital signage or in an information kiosk, the flexibility of Pioneer plasma technology will capture and hold people’s attention as they view the content displayed on the screen.”

The PDK-50HW3 touch screen device fits around the bezel of the PDP-503CMX and PDP-504CMX 50-inch professional plasma displays and uses a Pioneer exclusive high-speed infrared scanning system imbedded along the inside border of this sleek lightweight unit. Designed for easy operation and installation, the touch-screen device needs no calibration and is powered by and communicates with the plasma via a USB connection with no moving parts. The touch screen device increases the weight of the plasma by 16 lbs. 5 oz. while maintaining its low-profile appearance slightly increasing the dimensions of the plasma by approximately .75 inches on each side, making it ideal for permanent installations. Unlike other systems, the device is not an overlay on the plasma display causing image degradation. Instead, Pioneer’s touch screen device only covers the bezel, leaving users with a bright, clear on-screen image.

The touch-screen device is ideal for an assortment of presentation and display applications when combined with touch-screen software readily available in the market. The PDK-50HW3 provides presenters efficient operation of the plasma display to access, modify and emphasize vital facts and figures during meetings and presentations. With a dedicated writing pen that incorporates mouse button features, users are able to illustrate on-screen data with maximum effectiveness. In addition, the device allows a plasma display to be utilized as an interactive information board at public facilities or for in-store promotional advertisement, providing users with a wealth of information at their fingertips.

The PDK-50HW3 is currently available at a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $3995.

Explore further: Bitcoin exchange MtGox placed in administration: CEO

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

3-D printing yields advantages for US ITER engineers

Mar 12, 2014

(Phys.org) —ITER, the international fusion research facility now under construction in St. Paul-lez-Durance, France, has been called a puzzle of a million pieces. US ITER staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory ...

Samsung, LG bet on new display to revive TV sales

Jun 20, 2012

(AP) — South Korean TV manufacturers are making billion-dollar bets on a new display technology that promises an even thinner screen and imagery of eye-popping clarity. It might prove to be a costly last ...

Laser Phosphor Display (LPD) television - it's all done with mirrors

Jun 24, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Californian company Prysm has unveiled a high definition television with a "laser phosphor display" based on their patented method of using lasers reflected off a bank of mirrors to excite pixels on the television screen in a similar way to cathode ray tubes. ...

Recommended for you

Tech giants look to skies to spread Internet

2 hours ago

The shortest path to the Internet for some remote corners of the world may be through the skies. That is the message from US tech giants seeking to spread the online gospel to hard-to-reach regions.

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

3 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Wireless industry makes anti-theft commitment

4 hours ago

A trade group for wireless providers said Tuesday that the biggest mobile device manufacturers and carriers will soon put anti-theft tools on the gadgets to try to deter rampant smartphone theft.

Dish Network denies wrongdoing in $2M settlement

13 hours ago

The state attorney general's office says Dish Network Corp. will reimburse Washington state customers about $2 million for what it calls a deceptive surcharge, but the satellite TV provider denies any wrongdoing.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Tech giants look to skies to spread Internet

The shortest path to the Internet for some remote corners of the world may be through the skies. That is the message from US tech giants seeking to spread the online gospel to hard-to-reach regions.

Wireless industry makes anti-theft commitment

A trade group for wireless providers said Tuesday that the biggest mobile device manufacturers and carriers will soon put anti-theft tools on the gadgets to try to deter rampant smartphone theft.

ESO image: A study in scarlet

This new image from ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile reveals a cloud of hydrogen called Gum 41. In the middle of this little-known nebula, brilliant hot young stars are giving off energetic radiation that ...

First direct observations of excitons in motion achieved

A quasiparticle called an exciton—responsible for the transfer of energy within devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and semiconductor circuits—has been understood theoretically for decades. But exciton movement within ...

Warm US West, cold East: A 4,000-year pattern

Last winter's curvy jet stream pattern brought mild temperatures to western North America and harsh cold to the East. A University of Utah-led study shows that pattern became more pronounced 4,000 years ago, ...